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Why did you stop using chatroulette?

I actually stopped using it for about six months. We were developing a prototype that would let people anonymously share YouTube videos. And when we finally fixed the bug where people would post their real names and addresses to get access to the site, it was too late: The video embed code was already used to trick users into sharing private videos. I had to take the product off the market because the product was no longer secure. I had to take the product off the market because the product could be used to take credit card data and use it to take money out of people's accounts. And I had to take the product off the market because the product could be used to take a video and turn it into a link that took you to a page that let someone physically deliver a web site.

So this is what happened. I started receiving reports of phishing emails that had already gone viral, in which a hacker would pretend to be from Microsoft or Facebook and take over their computer and install malware on their behalf. I started to get reports of phishing emails that had already gone viral, in which a hacker would pretend to be from Microsoft or Facebook and take over their computer and install malware on their behalf. And as more people reported this kind of phishing attack, we started to see patterns in the reports, in which hackers used the same phishing email to both infiltrate and take over computers.

And so in early October, I decided to take a look at what these phishers were doing. And so I installed Malware-Aware, a new program I build specifically to try and find malware on chatroulette, and I started to follow up on these reports. And as I've said, I started to receive reports of phishing emails that had already gone viral, in which a hacker would pretend to be from Microsoft or Facebook and take over their computer and install malware on their behalf. I started to see reports that this malware wasn't actually malware at all, and so I started to investigate.

One of the first things I did was to look at the publicly available Malware-Aware reports, to see what I could learn about the phishers' techniques. What I saw alarmed me, and so I decided to investigate.

The first thing I discovered was that the phishers were actually very good at hiding their techniques. They were not only very successful in their attempts at hiding their malware, but they were very successful in hiding their malware using very basic tricks. For example, in their initial emails they used very simple HTML tags to hide the source, but over time as the hackers exploited these techniques, and also because the hackers learned a lot about the techniques, they started to insert hidden JavaScript code into the emails, to make them more malleable.

Later on, I discovered that the perpetrators of this activity were extremely selective about who they sent the malware to. The majority of their spam targets were actually